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METACHAT

MATCH: PANO

Metachat built a community platform for Pano. After each show, the viewers were invited to join the chat and talk about the things that matter, for them.  

A new era in journalism is emerging. One where people are not only interacting with, but helping the editorial teams. With Metachat, we can facilitate this on a save way. An interesting AI powered chatbot helped to focus on qualitative interactions.

LEARNINGS

1. Live Chat Generates 10x More Engagement

We launched the community at the start of the new season. It was quiet, very quiet … [crickets]. We thought we had done something wrong. Maybe the world does not need another community? BOOM!! a few minutes after the first episode, hundreds of messages were coming in. 10 weeks in, we came to the conclusion that this community was more engaged than Pano’s Facebook and Twitter combined. Measured by the number of messages, close to 10x more engaged.

2. When the community feels alive

People understood that this was live right now, almost synchronous. The community formed around specific timings like the release of a new topic, or the end of an episode. At those times, the feeling of belonging was tremendous. The episodes that had a smaller number of active users, actually had a bigger return in terms of quality. People wished each other good night, sleep tight.

3.What are we talking about?

For somebody jumping in the conversation, it takes some time to get acquainted with the current topic. We’ve come up with a two potential solutions for this.

  • Topic detection on a room level: this gives people an immediate overview of the subjects being discussed

  • Threads-to-rooms: this automatically creates a new room for threads with a certain volume.

4. immediate feedback

People know they are contributing something to your brand. While you can say anything about anyone on existing social platforms, a branded environment somehow feels like you’re in somebody’s house. You’re a little careful about what you say about them. This was counter balanced with allowing people to register pseudonymously. This resulted in motivated and constructive feedback about every episode.

5. No moderation without explanation

Moderating a community happened in 2 ways. We built a bot that prevented people from posting spam and stuff that was definitely not ok. We manually moderated personal attacks on people. Even though you’ve got this policy written down and published in the community, every time you moderate, you have to be prepared to explain your action immediately. This actually creates understanding and a feeling of safety in your community.

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